‘LIVE’ POLIO VACCINE FIRES UP IMMUNE SYSTEM PROVIDING PROTECTION FROM SARS-CoV-2 INFECTION

Global Virus Network (GVN) studies suggest that the oral polio vaccine can protect people in developing nations that do not yet have access to COVID vaccines

Baltimore, Maryland, USA, March 31, 2022: Two new studies from the Global Virus Network (GVN) in partnership with the Petroleum Industry Health Organization of Iran provide evidence that getting the oral polio vaccine made from live, weakened poliovirus may protect people from COVID-19 infection by stimulating the immune system.

One of these studies demonstrated a lower incidence of COVID infections in countries in which people received the ‘live’ polio vaccine compared to countries that only received the polio vaccine that does not contain a live virus. These findings were published on March 17, 2022, in PLOS One.

Another report from the research team showed that when young children received the ‘live’ polio vaccine their mothers, who were indirectly exposed to the poliovirus vaccine, did not get infected with COVID. This study was published late last year in JAMA Network Open.

Within a few hours of exposure to any pathogens — including weakened viruses like those in the oral polio vaccine —, the immune system activates its first line-of-defense. This defense produces an immune response to a broad variety of pathogen-related molecules and ramps up the immune system’s readiness for invaders: a process sometimes called ‘trained innate immunity.’ The outcome from one of these newest studies indicate that this trained innate immune response spurred by vaccination using the live poliovirus may provide protection for up to 6 months against COVID infection.

The researchers say that this implies that these live vaccines, technically known as live attenuated vaccines, may be used temporarily to protect people in low-income countries that do not yet have access to COVID vaccines.

“Although countries like the U.S. and those in Europe are dropping pandemic restrictions, many people in lower income countries remain unvaccinated due to lack of supply. Individuals in these countries are still at high risk for COVID infection and potential complications, particularly since these regions still lack the latest treatments and enough ventilators for those who need them,” said co-author Shyam Kottilil, MBBS, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Division of Clinical Care and Research, Institute of Human Virology, Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and senior advisor to the GVN. “These live vaccines may provide a stop gap to reduce hospitalizations and deaths until we can get these people COVID vaccines.”

Senior author on the studies Robert Gallo, MD, The Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine, Co-Founder and Director of the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, a GVN Center of Excellence, and Co-Founder of the GVN and Chair of the GVN’s Scientific Leadership Board, said, “Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, prior to development of effective vaccines we proposed using live attenuated vaccines as a temporary solution to boost immunity until the vaccine could be developed. This idea directly stemmed from my GVN colleague and co-author Dr. Konstantin Chumakov, whose parents were vaccine researchers in the 1970s Soviet Union. His parents observed that flu rates seemed to drop in those people given the oral polio vaccine. Other GVN colleagues joined us in advocating for studies to determine if these live attenuated vaccines would be a feasible strategy during the coronavirus pandemic. Now we have some of the first evidence that they do offer protection. I hope funders take notice and increase support for these types of trials that study the innate immune response and provide significant hope in mitigating future pandemics.”

Co-author Konstantin Chumakov, PhD, a GVN Center of Excellence Director, said, “These observations are yet another confirmation that live vaccines induce broad protection against infections caused by pathogens other than their direct target. They urgently call for the direct prospective clinical studies of this phenomenon that could lead to the development of a novel class of vaccines based on stimulation of trained innate immunity. Such vaccines could become the badly needed universal countermeasure against emerging infections.”

“The GVN serves as a catalyst to bring together the world’s foremost virologists,” Christian Bréchot, MD, PhD, President of the GVN, Associate Vice President for International Partnerships and Innovation at University of South Florida (USF), and Professor, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the GVN Southeast U.S. Regional Headquarters. “We are pleased to work with varying nations to initiate these important clinical trials.”

In the PLOS One study, the researchers compared infection rates per 100,000 people in 146 countries that received both the live and the injectable polio vaccine, which does not contain live virus, compared to 56 countries that only used the injectable, non-live version. They found infection rates in countries that did not use the live polio vaccine were about three times higher than those that did use the live polio vaccine.

For the JAMA Network Open study, the researchers followed 419 mothers in Iran whose young children were given the live polio vaccine compared to 3,771 mothers whose children did not receive the live polio vaccine. None of the mothers whose children received the live polio vaccine developed COVID, whereas 28 mothers whose children did not receive the live polio vaccine did contract COVID within 9 months. Researchers know that poliovirus and even the weakened virus from the vaccine can be shed in the stool. The researchers surmise that the mothers were exposed to virus when caring for their children through bathing and diaper changing.

“It is heartening to find similar study results obtained from very different approaches strengthening our hypothesis that using the oral vaccine may provide protection against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID,” said the first author on the studies Farrokh Habibzadeh, MD, Special Consultant on Public Health for the GVN and the Managing Director of the Research & Development Unit of the Petroleum Industry Health Organization of Shiraz, Iran. He added that, “This hypothesis should be tested in additional quality clinical trials, preferably conducted in countries where the oral polio vaccine is currently in use as part of their national immunization for polio.”

Co-author Kristen Stafford, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Public Health at the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and member of the GVN, said, “Some high-income countries declare pandemics over when in fact they just transition to only affecting low-income countries. We do not want this pandemic to become like the HIV-epidemic, where years and years of delays led to millions of excess deaths because the antiretroviral medications were too limited in supply or expensive to reach those disproportionately affected. We need to find simpler, inexpensive solutions to protect people until they can get their full doses and boosters of the COVID vaccines.”

One of the limitations of the live, weakened vaccines, is that they are not recommended for people with suppressed immune systems, as it could lead to infection.

“The important observations that the oral polio vaccine may protect against different infections such as COVID-19 is crucial for future pandemic preparedness. Understanding the mechanisms of protection induced by the oral polio vaccine and other live attenuated vaccines can open the door for the development of improved vaccination strategies to protect against broader infections, and thus provide partial protection against new pathogens during a pandemic until specific vaccines can be developed,” said Mihai Netea, MD, PhD of the Department of Internal Medicine and Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, a GVN Center of Excellence, and GVN Center Director.

Additional authors on the studies include Mohammad Sajadi, MD, Professor of Medicine at the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and member of the GVN; Mahboobeh Yadollahie, MD, Ashraf Simi, BScN, Saeid Saeidimehr, MD, (JAMA Network Open only), Mohammad Rafiei, MD, (JAMA Network Open only), and Iman Hafizi-Rastani, MSc (PLOS One only) of the Petroleum Industry Health Organization of Iran.

The authors received no specific funding for this work.

Dr. Kottilil received grants from Gilead for other research and serves on the advisory boards of Merck and Regeneron

About the Global Virus Network (GVN)

The Global Virus Network (GVN) is essential and critical in the preparedness, defense and first research response to emerging, existing and unidentified viruses that pose a clear and present threat to public health, working in close coordination with established national and international institutions. It is a coalition comprised of eminent human and animal virologists from 69 Centers of Excellence and 11 Affiliates in 37 countries worldwide, working collaboratively to train the next generation, advance knowledge about how to identify and diagnose pandemic viruses, mitigate and control how such viruses spread and make us sick, as well as develop drugs, vaccines and treatments to combat them. No single institution in the world has expertise in all viral areas other than the GVN, which brings together the finest medical virologists to leverage their individual expertise and coalesce global teams of specialists on the scientific challenges, issues and problems posed by pandemic viruses. The GVN is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. For more information, please visit gvn.org. Follow us on Twitter @GlobalVirusNews

Global Virus Network Adds the Aegis Consortium as Newest Center of Excellence

Baltimore, Maryland, USA, March 23, 2022: The Global Virus Network (GVN), representing 69 Centers of Excellence and 11 Affiliates in 37 countries comprising foremost experts in every class of virus causing disease in humans and some animals, and the Aegis Consortium at the University of Arizona Health Sciences announced today the induction of Aegis as GVN’s newest Center of Excellence.

“We are pleased to add the Aegis Consortium’s diverse experts from all corners of the human experience to develop pandemic solutions,” said Christian Bréchot, MD, PhD, who is President of the GVN and Professor at the University of South Florida.  “An immediate priority is to incorporate Aegis’ expertise on prolonged COVID-19 symptoms to identify risks contributing to post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as approaches for treatment and prevention.”

The Aegis Consortium is located within University of Arizona Health Sciences, an internationally recognized leader in biomedical research and one of the top-ranked academic medical centers in the southwestern United States. UArizona Health Sciences includes the College of Medicine – Tucson, College of Medicine – Phoenix, College of Nursing, R. Ken Coit College of Pharmacy, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, and Health Sciences Global and Online. Located on campuses in Tucson, Phoenix and Gilbert, Arizona, UArizona Health Sciences reaches across Arizona, the Southwest and around the world to provide next-generation education, research, clinical care and outreach. A major economic engine, UArizona Health Sciences employs nearly 5,000 people, has approximately 4,000 students and 900 faculty members, and garners more than $220 million in research grants and contracts annually.  In 2021, the University of Arizona’s research and development expenditures ranked in the top 4% of all U.S. universities. The latest GVN Center is led by Janko Nikolich-Žugich, MD, PhD, Director, Aegis Consortium, College of Medicine – Tucson, Department Head and Professor, Immunobiology, and Co-Director, Arizona Center on Aging.

“We look forward to fostering deep relationships and interactions with other GVN members and remaining highly participative and engaged with GVN’s many pursuits to help mitigate and manage pandemics,” said, Dr. Nikolich-Žugich“Aegis is very much aligned with GVN, and we intend to openly share and collaborate among our many shared research interests.”

The Aegis Consortium’s strength in developing strategies is defined by three pillars including: Pandemic Control, Prediction and Preparedness; Post-Acute effects of Pandemics on Individuals and Societies; and Resilience of Built and Natural Environments in Pandemic Control.  As a major university and research institution, Aegis comprises the full complement of biomedical science disciplines as well as internationally recognized researchers, many of whom have developed “industry firsts” relative to pandemic surveillance, clinical investigations and COVID-19 mitigation strategies. Aegis is one of 15 designated centers in the U.S. to study the ongoing effects of Long COVID through the RECOVER study, funded by National Health Lung and Blood Institute on a multi-year basis.

“The GVN looks forward to collaborating with the Aegis Consortium to improve the global understanding of COVID-19 and develop strategies to improve the health of communities impacted by pandemics,” said Robert Gallo, MD, The Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine, Co-Founder and Director of the Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, a GVN Center of Excellence, and Co-Founder and International Scientific Director of the GVN.

About the Global Virus Network (GVN)
The Global Virus Network (GVN) is essential and critical in the preparedness, defense and first research response to emerging, existing and unidentified viruses that pose a clear and present threat to public health, working in close coordination with established national and international institutions. It is a coalition comprised of eminent human and animal virologists from 69 Centers of Excellence and 11 Affiliates in 37 countries worldwide, working collaboratively to train the next generation, advance knowledge about how to identify and diagnose pandemic viruses, mitigate and control how such viruses spread and make us sick, as well as develop drugs, vaccines and treatments to combat them. No single institution in the world has expertise in all viral areas other than the GVN, which brings together the finest medical virologists to leverage their individual expertise and coalesce global teams of specialists on the scientific challenges, issues and problems posed by pandemic viruses. The GVN is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. For more information, please visit www.gvn.org. Follow us on Twitter @GlobalVirusNews

Media Contact:
Nora Samaranayake, GVN
410-706-1966
[email protected]

GVN Adds the Centre Scientifique de Monaco as Newest Member to Combat Viral Threats

Baltimore, Maryland, USA, March 22, 2022: The Global Virus Network (GVN), representing 69 Centers of Excellence and 11 Affiliates in 37 countries comprising foremost experts in every class of virus causing disease in humans, and the Centre Scientifique de Monaco (CSM) announced CSM as GVN’s newest Affiliate.

“Just last year, we co-hosted a significant international meeting with Monaco to help curb the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in developing nations, and focus on establishing innovative platforms for the diagnostics of key human pathogens and drive innovative public health strategies to monitor the efficacy of vaccines against COVID19,” said Christian Bréchot, MD, PhD, President of the GVN, Associate Vice President for International Partnerships and Innovation at University of South Florida (USF), and Professor, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the GVN Southeast U.S. Regional Headquarters.  “I look forward to working with the Centre Scientifique de Monaco and its partners in the Principality of Monaco to build global collaboration efforts to identify cutting-edge technologies, integrate the impact of environmental changes on biodiversity and nutrition and prepare for future pandemics.”

The CSM is historically involved in marine and polar biology research and has included human research over the last decade with several publications in the most prestigious journals such as the Nature series. In 2013, according to the will of Prince Albert II, CSM created The Department of Medical Biology to advance fundamental research programs such as the mechanisms of innate immunity involved in the defense against infections affecting invertebrates and humans, cell metabolism and abnormal proliferation of tumor cells.  The Department also develops translation studies designed to transmit laboratory data as quickly as possible for the benefit of patients suffering from cancer or muscular pathologies.  The team is dedicated to the management and financing of clinical research programs that contribute to the edifice of precision medicine, through the development of new therapeutic approaches with optimal efficacy.

The latest GVN Affiliate is led by Thomas Althaus, MD, MSc, DPhil, an infectious disease doctor specialized in public health and epidemiology, with an extensive experience of diagnostics in the context of developing nations.

“CSM looks forward to the exchange and synergy of scientific research projects with teams from the GVN,” said Dr. Althaus.  “While Monaco has its own national agenda, we aim to meet worldwide challenges like the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. We see terrific potential for collaborations with GVN to improve diagnosis, treatment, prevention and surveillance of public health global threats.”

“We are pleased to add CSM to our growing international network as Monaco will be an important contributor to our European region, and overall network,” said Robert Gallo, MD, The Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine, Co-Founder and Director of the Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, a GVN Center of Excellence, and Co-Founder and International Scientific Advisor of the GVN.

About the Global Virus Network (GVN)
The Global Virus Network (GVN) is essential and critical in the preparedness, defense and first research response to emerging, existing and unidentified viruses that pose a clear and present threat to public health, working in close coordination with established national and international institutions. It is a coalition comprised of eminent human and animal virologists from 69 Centers of Excellence and 11 Affiliates in 37 countries worldwide, working collaboratively to train the next generation, advance knowledge about how to identify and diagnose pandemic viruses, mitigate and control how such viruses spread and make us sick, as well as develop drugs, vaccines, and treatments to combat them. No single institution in the world has expertise in all viral areas other than the GVN, which brings together the finest medical virologists to leverage their individual expertise and coalesce global teams of specialists on the scientific challenges, issues and problems posed by pandemic viruses. The GVN is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. For more information, please visit www.gvn.org. Follow us on Twitter @GlobalVirusNews

Media Contact:
Nora Samaranayake, GVN
410-706-1966
[email protected]

GVN Announces Inaugural Participants of Postdoctoral Fellowship Program

The three awardees will receive training and mentorship to help support and propel their rising careers in virology

BALTIMORE, MD, March 8, 2022: The Global Virus Network (GVN), a coalition comprised of human and animal virologists from 68 Centers of Excellence and 10 Affiliates in 36 countries, today announced the three inaugural members of the GVN Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.  This new program, funded by a private donor and Sanofi, was created to identify and support promising, postdoctoral researchers and engage them with top virology experts and cutting-edge research initiatives.

“GVN is a safety net against viral disease and is our best defense against current viral killers and those unknown on the horizon,” said Christian Bréchot, MD, PhD, President of the GVN, Associate Vice President for International Partnerships and Innovation at University of South Florida, and Professor, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the GVN Southeast U.S. Regional Headquarters. “We are so pleased to welcome our inaugural postdoctoral fellows to GVN’s elite training and mentoring program so that the global safety and preparedness network against viruses is strengthened.”

“Sanofi is committed to helping train the next generation of scientists and so was pleased to be able to sponsor a postdoctoral fellow as part of the GVN postdoctoral fellowship program,” said Jim Tartaglia, PhD, Vice-President R&D for vaccines, Sanofi.

“Throughout history, millions died and millions more were infected by pandemic viruses because governments and health authorities throughout the world were insufficiently prepared and unable to join forces in order to harness the collective knowledge, expertise, resources, and technologies necessary to effectively battle such viruses,” said Robert Gallo, MD, The Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine, Co-Founder and Director of the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, a GVN Center of Excellence, and Co-Founder and International Scientific Director of the GVN. “Even in our current pandemic, we have seen mistakes that have cost lives unnecessarily.  We cannot permit this to happen again, either in our lifetime or in future generations, which is why my colleagues, and I formed the GVN to, among other important initiatives, highly train the next generation of virologists.”  

As the only coalition of its kind, the GVN Postdoctoral Fellowship Program offers a rare opportunity for future virology leaders to collaborate with key researchers, medical practitioners and decision makers driving scientific, evidence-based solutions for some of today’s largest challenges in public health. The three awardees and the three hosting GVN Centers of Excellence for the inaugural cohort of the program include:

  • Rubaiyea (Ruby) Farrukee, PhD, (Australia), The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Australia, GVN Center of Excellence
  • Birendra Prasad Gupta, PhD, (Nepal), Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, USA, GVN Center of Excellence
  • William Marciel de Souza, PhD, (Brazil), Institute for Human Infections and Immunity and the Department of Microbiology & Immunology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, USA, GVN Center of Excellence

“I am really honoured to have received this amazing opportunity to build my career in virology,” said Rubaiyea (Ruby) Farrukee, PhD.  “This Fellowship will be pivotal in my pursuit of setting up an independent research program, with the aim of studying respiratory viruses within the context of innate immunity. I look forward to conducting some exciting science and increasing my collaboration with the GVN network”.

“The GVN has provided me the opportunity at the appropriate phase in my career to expand my portfolio in innovative research on viral disease and vaccine development,” said Birendra Prasad Gupta, PhD. “Recently, Nepal, and nations around the world, have experienced COVID-19’s harsh impact on every aspect of life. The pandemic alerted regulatory bodies to provide more resources in cutting-edge technology and to promote research through collaborative work.”

“I am excited by this exceptional opportunity to receive training in cutting-edge research in arbovirology and grantsmanship, and to expand my scientific expertise, and increase research collaborations with members of the GVN,” said William Marciel de Souza, PhD“This program will accelerate my research activities and support my pursuit towards an independent career in research, building my own group. After the GVN fellowship, I will apply for long-term support to sustain and conduct my own research line on arboviruses.”

Last year, GVN received a donation of US$1 million to support the GVN Academy, an initiative that fosters global collaboration by providing training and mentoring programs for rising junior virologists. With these funds, the organization launched the GVN Rising Star Program, which plans to mentor 15 scientists over the course of two years as well as connect each mentee with a GVN senior virologist who can help provide one-on-one research and career guidance, and the GVN Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, which will train three postdoctoral researchers during a two-year term with the option to rotate among two GVN Centers of Excellence.  Sanofi provided funding for a third awardee to be trained under the GVN Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.  Participants of the program will also be invited to participate in exclusive GVN meetings and other professional development opportunities in virology.

We are very pleased and honored to host one of the inaugural fellows here at the University of Texas Medical Branch, one of the first GVN Centers of Excellence,” said Scott Weaver, PhD, the John Sealy Distinguished Chair in Infection and Immunity, Chair, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Director, Institute for Human Infections & Immunity
Scientific Director, Galveston National Laboratory (GNL), and Director of its GVN Center of Excellence. “Bright, energetic young scientists like Dr. William Marciel de Souza, who bring a global orientation to new approaches for controlling emerging viral diseases, often catalyze the most effective international collaborations in the unique spirit of the GVN.”

“GVN is well positioned to enable those at the top of their field to mentor and train the next generations of virologists so that we can be more assured of a healthy future with a continuous adequate supply of responsible, highly-trained virologists,” said Sharon Lewin, AO, FRACP, PhD, FAAHMS, GVN Center Director and Director at The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Australia, a GVN Center of Excellence, and evaluation committee member of the GVN Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

To learn more about the GVN Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, visit here.

About the Global Virus Network (GVN)

The Global Virus Network (GVN) is essential and critical in the preparedness, defense and first research response to emerging, exiting and unidentified viruses that pose a clear and present threat to public health, working in close coordination with established national and international institutions. It is a coalition comprised of eminent human and animal virologists from 68 Centers of Excellence and 10 Affiliates in 36 countries worldwide, working collaboratively to train the next generation, advance knowledge about how to identify and diagnose pandemic viruses, mitigate and control how such viruses spread and make us sick, as well as develop drugs, vaccines and treatments to combat them. No single institution in the world has expertise in all viral areas other than the GVN, which brings together the finest medical virologists to leverage their individual expertise and coalesce global teams of specialists on the scientific challenges, issues and problems posed by pandemic viruses. The GVN is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. For more information, please visit www.gvn.org. Follow us on Twitter @GlobalVirusNews

Media Contact:
Nora Samaranayake, GVN
443-823-0613
[email protected]

A Statement from the Global Virus Network on the 2022 Russian Invasion of Ukraine

BALTIMORE, MD, March 2, 2022The Global Virus Network (GVN) is an apolitical global organization comprised of the world’s leading scientists, including those from Russia and Ukraine, who specialize in education and research for the purpose of protecting mankind from viral proliferation and viruses that cause pandemics.  The scientists of the Global Virus Network collaborate to alleviate the pain and suffering caused by viral pathogens and to mitigate the threat they pose to mankind.

The members of the Global Virus Network are motivated by the fundamental tenet of medicine; “to do no harm” and are dedicated to honoring the sanctity of life irrespective of culture, ethnicity, nationality or race.  We are scientists, not politicians, but we are compelled to raise our voices in unison to protest the invasion and wanton destruction of Ukrainian cities and the savage killing of innocent civilians and members of the military who are defending their Homeland in the name of freedom and autonomy. They seek only peace. Mr. Putin, grant them peace. Mr. Putin, cease the armed hostilities immediately and enter into negotiations conducted in accord with respect for human life and dignity. We are committed to universal moral principles that govern the humane treatment of human beings and dictate the norms of civilized relations between nations.  The current invaders of Ukraine are not exempted from the unequivocal adherence to these principles, for all members of humanity, “are not islands separate and apart, but part of the main.”  Mr Putin, stop the aggression now!

In the spirit of interconnectedness, we urge the combatants to cease hostilities and engage in negotiations to peacefully resolve their armed conflict.  May this war in which the bitterest enmities have been invoked, be terminated with “malice toward none and justice for all.”  May the sacrifices and suffering already endured be an impetus for peace, and may our common humanity provide the moral imperative by which the sanctity of life and human dignity take precedence over the bristling antagonisms which provided an incitement to force.

Let peace not be cast as a victory or defeat for either side, but as a triumph of morality arrived at by ethical individuals acting on behalf of their respective nations.  When morality emerges as victorious, we can rest assured that mankind endures and prevails as the ultimate beneficiary.

About the Global Virus Network (GVN) 

The Global Virus Network (GVN) is essential and critical in the preparedness, defense and first research response to emerging, exiting and unidentified viruses that pose a clear and present threat to public health, working in close coordination with established national and international institutions. It is a coalition comprised of eminent human and animal virologists from 68 Centers of Excellence and 10 Affiliates in 36 countries worldwide, working collaboratively to train the next generation, advance knowledge about how to identify and diagnose pandemic viruses, mitigate and control how such viruses spread and make us sick, as well as develop drugs, vaccines and treatments to combat them. No single institution in the world has expertise in all viral areas other than the GVN, which brings together the finest medical virologists to leverage their individual expertise and coalesce global teams of specialists on the scientific challenges, issues and problems posed by pandemic viruses. The GVN is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. For more information, please visit www.gvn.org. Follow us on Twitter @GlobalVirusNews

 

Media Contact:

Nora Samaranayake, GVN
443-823-0613
[email protected]